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Archive for the ‘Intervention’ Category

We are pleased to announce the opening of our Florida WCity_Hallest Coast (AKA Cultural Coast) office!

We have no wait for ABA services! We accept most forms of insurance. We provide services in your home, in your child’s school, in your child’s daycare, and other community locations.

 

Please contact our office if you are interested in obtaining services.

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You know, I like to be positive. But today on this International Autism Day (AKA Light It Up Blue #LIUB), I’m not getting the feeling that we have the “awareness” we need. And it makes me ANGRY.LIUB

Yes, I’m happy that thanks to Autism Speaks we have 45+ states with insurance mandates!

 

But I’m boiling red mad because “awareness” is not enough!¬†ūüė°

We need:

  1. Children identified EARLY. Pediatricians should lose their license when they send a family away and tell them to wait. REFER! A licensed clinician, with expertise in early identification, can determine if it’s autism.
  2. When the child is diagnosed, early intervention happens IMMEDIATELY without waiting lists or delays.
  3. Every child should be able to receive applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy at the intensity recommended by the professional and based on assessment. This should be without regard to race, native language, socio-economic status, or type of insurance coverage. If you want to know more about ABA, read here.
  4. Every child with symptoms should be screened for appropriate medical treatment of any GI problems such as reflux, constipation, diarrhea, or food allergies/insensitivities.
  5. Every child should have access to quality behavioral feeding intervention if assessment indicates it is warranted.

Until these things happen, I will stay mad or “I mad” as one of my clients told me recently (when he found out he couldn’t have chocolate ice cream.) Go ahead, light it up blue but let’s turn awareness to ACTION!

 

Related Posts

 

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The field of special education and behavior analysis lost a great man last week. Stan Deno, Ph.D. served on faculty in the College of Education and Human Development at The University of Minnesota (commonly referreStan Denod to as The U) from 1970 (or so) until he retired in 2009. During that time, Stan developed a framework for monitoring student progress towards their academic goals. His work in Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) is the foundation for DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills; Good & Kiminski, 2002) which has been used in thousands of schools across the country.

Stan also trained many students including undergraduate, masters level, and doctoral level. Two of his students, Doug and Lynn Fuchs, have led the way in developing Response to Intervention (RTI) an evidence-based approach to identifying students with learning disabilities and behavior disorders.

If you don’t know Stan or haven’t read his work, you should make time to do so.¬†Without a doubt, his work has influenced the way we monitor progress in schools and the way we address instruction for students with learning and behavioral needs.

I have many fond memories of Stan. I feel so lucky to have studied with him during my time at The U. He worked diligently to help me slow down when I spoke (I talk fast and southern and it was difficult for him to understand me). He also modeled for me the act of thinking carefully before speaking. If you know me, you know I still am working on this skill!

Stan trusted me to serve as his Teaching Assistant (TA) in the Intro to ABA class. He taught me how to teach adult learners and how to give meaningful feedback on their written work. During this time, he also taught me the importance of technology in the classroom to increase graduate student participation and responding. I am a much better teacher now because of Stan.

I took several classes from Stan. The most memorable included the course on Single Subject Design. In this course, Stan introduced me to the work of Alan Kazdin and he taught me to conduct experimentally sou
nd research studies as well as how to read research and interpret and apply it in my own work. His influence enabled me to write successful grants, publish my own science, and go on to teach my own students. Stan also served on my dissertation committee where he modeled for me how to help students improve their research ideas, study procedures, and how to interpret results accurately. I was so fortunate to learn so much from him.

In addition to our love of research, behavior analysis, and helping students learn, Stan and I both shared the diagnosis of cancer. I received my diagnosis in 2002 some time after he received his diagnosis and treatment. I stopped by the U to visit Stan while I was in town later that same year. We shared how hard living as a survivor can be and we shared how crushing the diagnosis can be. It was then that Stan shared with me the theory of the Sword of Damocles. It took some time for me to truly understand this concept as a new survivor. But oh do I understand it now, 14 years later.

My heart sank to my stomach last week when I learned of Stan’s passing. But, I have joy in knowing how much he taught me and how much he has taught the special education world. Stan will be missed.

The family asks that in lieu of¬†flowers contributions be made in memory of Stanley Deno to:¬†‚ÄúStan Deno CBM Research‚ÄĚ fund #20003 at the University of Minnesota Foundation.

Online gifts can be made at:  www.give.umn.edu/giveto/standeno

Or mail this giving form to:

University of Minnesota Foundation
P.O. Box 860266
Minneapolis, MN 55486-0266

 

References

Good, R.H., & Kkaminski, R.A. (2002). Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (6th ed.). Eugene, OR: Institute for the Development of Educational Achievement. Available: http://dibels.uoregon.edu.

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child taking pillsA shout out to Carmen who stopped by the blog yesterday asking questions about the types of data we collect when working on pill swallowing. I thought I would post a copy of one of our data sheets for reference. As with any area of work, please follow BACB Ethical Guidelines regarding scope of practice. Teaching children to swallow pills can be dangerous and should not be attempted without appropriate training and supervision. Additionally, a medical screening prior to intervention is essential.

pill swallowing datasheet

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Logo2012 was a great year for the Applied Behavioral Strategies blog. We had almost 100,000 visitors in total. Here is a list of the most visited blog postings last year. The great news is that I wrote some of the most visited posts in 2011. I am pleased that my posts remain relevant for readers.

#5. Early Morning School Routines. Who doesn’t need help with this? Seriously, it is THE most stressful time of the day for my house.

#4 Just Say No. I can see why this one has staying power. Almost daily, I hear myself saying “Parents need to learn to say no.” You don’t even have to state a reason. Just know that your child needs to learn to accept being told no. (And despite how it may feel or sound, it will NOT be the end of the world.)

#3 Autism Awareness Apps. I really need to update this link. I will be sure to do so in time for April give aways. Keep in mind that I’m also presenting on this topic at SXSW in Austin, TX in March, 2013.

#2. Do You Use Visual Schedules? Wow. I am pleased that this topic is still a hit. If you aren’t using visual schedules, you should! In my home, we use a homework whiteboard every day and it makes our afternoons a BREEZE!

#1. Using ABA to Teach Math. I had no idea when I wrote this post that it would become so popular. The great news is that ABA may be used for a variety of skills!

I cannot thank you enough for your readership! Keep the reading, following, sharing, ideas, feedback, and questions for Ask Missy Monday coming!

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Hi! and welcome to What Works Wednesdays where historically a success story from clinical files is shared. With all the buzz about the latest “research” on getting the flu while pregnant and the supposed link to autism, it seems logical to help readers better understand research so they can interpret findings themselves. If readers know how to read research, then they are better able to know if an intervention works (or if the conclusions from a study are flawed or misinterpreted).

What is Research?

  • “work undertaken systematically to increase the stock of knowledge” (Wikipedia.org)
  • “diligent and systematic inquiry or investigation into a subject in order to discover or revise facts, theories, applications, etc.” (dictionary.com)

Most scientists conduct research by utilizing the scientific method. The scientific method requires the development of a hypothesis (which is usually formed from observation or reading other research), conducting the experiment, gathering results, and determining if the results support the original hypothesis.

Different Types of Research

Using the scientific method, scientists design different types of studies. These study types include:

  1. Experiments. In experimental studies, researchers recruit participants and assign them to treatment groups. Researchers can study one or more treatments and participants may receive some treatments or they may receive a placebo or no treatment at all. Usually, researchers measure one or more important variables before the study and they measure the variable(s) again after the study.
  2. Single Subject Experimental Studies. In these studies (most often conducted by behavior analysts), researchers recruit participants who are observed and measured carefully for a period of time before receiving treatment. Researchers then implement treatment while continuing to observe and measure carefully.
  3. Correlational studies. In these studies, researchers use existing data sets (e.g., collected for some other purpose) or they recruit participants. Researchers gather a wide range of information on each participant (e.g., age, SES, education, health history). Participants do not generally receive treatments or interventions of any kind.
  4. Qualitative studies. In qualitative studies, researchers occasional recruit participants but at times they enroll participants with whom they are already familiar. In qualitative studies, researchers study one or more individuals or one or more groups (e.g., one class). Researchers carefully study the participant and take copious notes. Researchers may interview the participants and they may use focus groups to better understand some of the issues. If a treatment is provided, the researcher continues to carefully study the participants to document the participants’ responses to the treatment.

Conclusions Based on Study Type

Researchers must use caution when drawing conclusions about their studies. Researchers who use well-designed experimental designs can draw cause-effect conclusions. For example, a researcher can enroll a bunch of smokers in a study. Some of the smokers receive a behavioral treatment, some of the smokers receive nicotine patches, and other participants receive both. At the end of the study (if the researchers have conducted the study carefully), the researchers will be able to say that one or more methods is successful at helping smokers quit.

Similarly, in a single subject experimental study, researchers can demonstrate if a treatment changes behavior. Again, the study must be carefully designed and conducted but it is possible to draw cause-effect conclusions. For example, a researcher could study 3 smokers. The researcher would observe the smokers and collect data. One smoker could receive treatment. While she is being studied, the other smokers would still be studied. After the first smoker quits successfully, the next smoker would receive treatment. He would continue to be studied as would the non-treated smoker. Finally, when the last smoker receives treatment, researchers continue to observe him. If the researchers successfully help all 3 participants quit smoking (and the study is carefully designed and carried out), they will be able to say that the treatment caused the behavior change.

Correlational versus Causal

Correlational studies are designed to determine if any relationships exist between variables. Researchers could gather data on 1,000 people from an existing data base. They could sort the data into smokers and non-smokers. They could run a simple data analysis to see if smokers have other tendencies (e.g., like to go to race car events, like to drink socially, and so forth). Researchers may not conclude causal relationships from their studies. They are only able to conclude that a relationship exists. Of more importance is the strength of the relationship. For example, if researchers ran an analysis on the relationship between giving birth to a child and gender, they would find a very strong (almost perfect) relationship between giving birth and being a female. If a weak relationship exists between variables it is more likely due to chance.

Go Forth and Read

In these days of social media, spin rooms, and media crazed talk shows, very poorly designed studies are being presented to the public without appropriate interpretation of the study or its results. If you are interested in reading a few examples of this, check previous posts here and here.

In summary, don’t believe everything you read about the “latest scientific study” unless you read the study itself. When you read the actual study, what you find may actually surprise you.

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Here at Applied Behavioral Strategies, our mission is to improve the quality of life through effective intervention. One way we hope to do that is by reviewing research articles for our readers. Today‚Äôs article is titled “Brief Report: Increasing Verbal Greeting Initiations for a Student with Autism Via a Social StoryTM Intervention”. Brian Reichow and Edward Sabornie authored the article and The Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders published the article.

Study Purpose

It is a known fact that children with autism spectrum disorders have social deficits. One intervention that has been used is Social Stories. While social stories are widely used, the research on the effectiveness has been limited. Thus, the authors set out to determine if a Social Story could be used to increase appropriate verbal greeting initiations.

Study Methods

The authors enrolled an 11-year-old male with autism in the study. “George” as he was called, had an average IQ and he had above average grades on his report card. While he attended a social skills group at school, his social skills did not seem to be improving.

The authors developed a story according the guidelines recommended by Carol Gray. We discussed some of the differences between Social Stories TM and social stories or social narratives earlier this week.

The authors used a withdrawal design to demonstrate experimental control. Basically, in this design, an intervention is implemented. If the intervention is effected, it is removed to determine if the behavior would return to pre-treatment levels.

The authors merely counted the number (or frequency) of verbal greeting initiations. Waves and gestures did not count, only verbal greetings (e.g., hi, hello, good morning).

In baseline, George reported to his home room, picked up his schedule, and went about his day.

During intervention, George picked up his schedule (which included “read your Social Story”) and then read his social story before heading out to classes. The authors faded the social story and moved to a simple “cue card”.

Results

During baseline, George had zero verbal initiations. During intervention, George had an immediate increase in verbal greeting initiations. Specifically, he initiated greetings between 2 and 6 times a day; including greetings to peers! However, when the intervention was “withdrawn”, George stopped initiating greetings. When the intervention was reinstated, his initiations increased again to 2 to 4 initiations per day; including initiations to peers. When the social story was faded and the cue card was taught, the verbal initiations continued.

Conclusions

As we have discussed, this intervention is effective. Also as we have discussed, all interventions should be developed on an individualized basis. This is not a one size fits all approach. This individualization means that teachers, behavior analysts, and other practitioners will need to spend time developing the materials that will be used to teach the skill(s).

 

 

 

 

 

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