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Archive for January, 2013

Parents and professionals working together

Parents and professionals working together

Hi and Welcome to What Works Wednesday! where the focus is usually the description of a successful case story. The general public is slowly beginning to learn and appreciate the fact ABA works. However, in an ongoing comprehensive ABA program for individuals, more than just good ABA is required. Parent and professional collaboration is an essential ingredient. In ABA teams at Applied Behavioral Strategies, the BCBAs work to ensure that every case has 4 hours of parent-professional contact at a minimum each month. Collaboration occurs in a variety of contexts.

Team Meetings

In a comprehensive program, it is important for the team to meet frequently to guarantee that the team is implementing programs correctly and that programs are modified so that the child will continue to make progress. In most cases, the team meets twice per month for 2 hours. The first order of business at every meeting: parent concerns. The team includes all therapists, the supervisor (BCBA), the parents, and other outside professionals.

Clinic/Team Meeting Notes

During the team meetings, detailed notes are taken so that team members may review them before therapy. Everyone receives a copy of the notes, including the parents. The notes are also placed in the child’s program book so they are handy for team members.

Communication Logs

In cases where the child receives therapy in a setting where the parent is not present, therapists and supervisors keep a detailed communication log that is sent home with the child each day. These logs keep the parents informed about the child’s day and serves as another way to build cohesive team communication.

Phone Consultation

Supervisors at Applied Behavioral Strategies make themselves available by phone. Supervisors are extremely busy but a great time to return calls is between appointments when driving from place to place (don’t forget to use your headset!). Parents, if you need to speak to your supervisor, let him/her know so that time can be made for the call.

Emails

Finally, email is another way to remain in close contact with parents. Emails can be returned at any time of day; especially when talking by phone is not possible. Emails also provide a written record of your requests and decision making.

In summary, professionals be diligent to ensure parent-professional collaboration. Parents, do not be timid. Partner with your BCBA and team to help propel your child’s progress to its maximum potential.

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Logo2012 was a great year for the Applied Behavioral Strategies blog. We had almost 100,000 visitors in total. Here is a list of the most visited blog postings last year. The great news is that I wrote some of the most visited posts in 2011. I am pleased that my posts remain relevant for readers.

#5. Early Morning School Routines. Who doesn’t need help with this? Seriously, it is THE most stressful time of the day for my house.

#4 Just Say No. I can see why this one has staying power. Almost daily, I hear myself saying “Parents need to learn to say no.” You don’t even have to state a reason. Just know that your child needs to learn to accept being told no. (And despite how it may feel or sound, it will NOT be the end of the world.)

#3 Autism Awareness Apps. I really need to update this link. I will be sure to do so in time for April give aways. Keep in mind that I’m also presenting on this topic at SXSW in Austin, TX in March, 2013.

#2. Do You Use Visual Schedules? Wow. I am pleased that this topic is still a hit. If you aren’t using visual schedules, you should! In my home, we use a homework whiteboard every day and it makes our afternoons a BREEZE!

#1. Using ABA to Teach Math. I had no idea when I wrote this post that it would become so popular. The great news is that ABA may be used for a variety of skills!

I cannot thank you enough for your readership! Keep the reading, following, sharing, ideas, feedback, and questions for Ask Missy Monday coming!

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graphHi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I respond to a question from readers. Today’s question was posted on a list serve for parents and family members of individuals with autism. The mom wrote,

“As far as data collection, I hear about the BCBA doing it but I have never seen it nor heard specific results. I requested the data and the BCBA told me that as an outside consultant she is not allowed to provide it.

Having taught a course on Ethics and Professional Issues for behavior analysts, and in addition to offering on-going coursework related to ethical issues for Board Certified Behavior Analysts, hearing things like this really upsets me.

Guideline 2.0 Responsibility to Client

The Behavior Analyst Certifying Board (BACB) has developed a set of Guidelines that BCBAs and BCaBAs must follow. These guidelines are called the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and they may be viewed here. One of the guidelines states that “the behavior analyst has the responsibility to operate in the best interest of the client“. When the client is a minor or incapacitated (i.e., unable to make decisions for him/her self), the client’s parents or guardians become the client.

In the case above, the BCBA is claiming that her responsibility lies with the school district who is paying her salary. Unfortunately, the school district is a third-party payer. While the BCBA has responsibilities to her employer, those responsibilities cannot override her primary responsibility to the client. In fact, the guidelines address this issues.

Guideline 2.05 Third Party Requests for Services

This guideline has two parts. First the guideline states that “When a behavior analyst agrees to provide services to a person or entity at the request of a third-party, the behavior analyst clarifies to the extent feasible, at the outset of the service, the nature of the relationship with each party. This clarification includes the role of the behavior analyst (such as therapist, organizational consultant, or expert witness), the probable uses of the services provided or the information obtained, and the fact that there may be limits to confidentiality.

The guidelines go on to state that “If there is a foreseeable risk of the behavior analyst being called upon to perform conflicting roles because of the involvement of a third party, the behavior analyst clarifies the nature and direction of his or her responsibilities, keeps all parties appropriately informed as matters develop, and resolves the situation in accordance with these Guidelines.

So, while the district is paying for the services, the client is the child and his/her guardian. When he client requests their data, the behavior analyst must make those data available.

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200306160-001After more than a week with my niece and nephews, I have so many funny comments to share that I cannot possibly remember them all. This one stuck out as one of the most memorable.

Aunt Missy (to another adult): “I think I am doing well, considering the fact that I had surgery only 7 weeks ago”

7-year-old nephew: “Aunt Missy, I didn’t know you had surgery. Are you gonna die?”

Aunt Missy (laughing): “Oh no honey! I just had my gall bladder out”

Nephew: “What’s a gall bladder”

Aunt Missy: “Well, it is an organ (body part) that holds bile”

Nephew: “Oh! I have two of them. They are right next to my wiener!”

Readers, did any of you have this much fun on your holiday break? Please share!

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New Year ResolutionAs behavior analysts, we are faced with many responsibilities. Before we even think about seeing clients, we must first acknowledge the need to uphold our ethical obligations. We have a number of rules and principles to keep in mind. These include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Core ethical principles for psychologists
  • BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct
  • State Laws
  • Federal Laws

As we embark on the new year, I have a few resolutions for me and my fellow behavior analysts to consider.

  1. I will strive to keep reinforcement a top priority by conducting preference assessments and reinforcer inventories frequently (relates to BACB Guideline 4.05)
  2. I will strive to keep my client’s rights ahead of my own interests and conveniences (relates to BACB Guideline 2.0)
  3. I will strive to engage in professional behaviors at all times so that others view our profession with high regard (relates to BACB Guideline 7.01)
  4. I will strive to remain current in the research related to my area of practice (relates to BACB Guideline 1.03)
  5. I will strive to be the best behavior analyst that I can be (relates to Guideline 1.0)

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