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We will be exhibiting, sponsoring, and speaking at the upcoming Mass ABA Conference on Thursday, May 4th, 2017. If you are attending the conference, please stop by our booth or come to the presentation on Ethical Issues in Billing!

 

Mark your calendars for a feeding talk out in Moodus, CT on Tuesday May 16, 2017 at 6:30 pm. The talk will be held at Nathan Hale-Ray Middle School Library on 73 Clark Gate Rd. See the attached flyer for additional information.

 

You know, I like to be positive. But today on this International Autism Day (AKA Light It Up Blue #LIUB), I’m not getting the feeling that we have the “awareness” we need. And it makes me ANGRY.LIUB

Yes, I’m happy that thanks to Autism Speaks we have 45+ states with insurance mandates!

 

But I’m boiling red mad because “awareness” is not enough!¬†ūüė°

We need:

  1. Children identified EARLY. Pediatricians should lose their license when they send a family away and tell them to wait. REFER! A licensed clinician, with expertise in early identification, can determine if it’s autism.
  2. When the child is diagnosed, early intervention happens IMMEDIATELY without waiting lists or delays.
  3. Every child should be able to receive applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy at the intensity recommended by the professional and based on assessment. This should be without regard to race, native language, socio-economic status, or type of insurance coverage. If you want to know more about ABA, read here.
  4. Every child with symptoms should be screened for appropriate medical treatment of any GI problems such as reflux, constipation, diarrhea, or food allergies/insensitivities.
  5. Every child should have access to quality behavioral feeding intervention if assessment indicates it is warranted.

Until these things happen, I will stay mad or “I mad” as one of my clients told me recently (when he found out he couldn’t have chocolate ice cream.) Go ahead, light it up blue but let’s turn awareness to ACTION!

 

Related Posts

 

We are pleased to announce the launch of our new website! It is the same URL address, just new updatesgraph to make it easier for mobile users to stay in touch.

Our applied behavior analysis (ABA) team has worked hard to complete professional photos, update bios, and introduce our new behavioral feeding page!

Don’t miss our upcoming webinars for 2017. We offer group rates for 3 or more individuals from the same agency who are taking the course from separate computers. Our best discount is for groups who will share a computer during the webinar! Register 1 person at full price and all others are only $10! That’s right, $10 for the whole course when you share a computer. To register, simply visit our website here, scroll to the very bottom, enter your name and other pertinent information, enter an abbreviated title, and follow the link to PayPal where you may pay with your account or with any credit card. We also accept purchase orders from school districts!

Did you know that ABS has a monthly journal club where you earn 1 CE each month? Did I mention that the  Journal Club is FREE? All you have to do is join the club, read the article, and be present for the discussion. Email the info line at: info at applied behavioral strategies dot com to join the journal club.

If you haven’t been to our page in a while, hop over for a visit to meet our amazing team of BCBAs. (As an aside, we are currently hiring full- and part-time BCBAs. ¬†If you are bi-lingual Spanish, we would be thrilled. We are also hiring part-time behavior therapists.) Come join our awesome team!

And finally, if you just want to stay in touch, join our mailing list here.

If you like what you see, say so! Like this post, like our facebook page, or follow us on LinkedIn,

We are excited to announce the first free workshop for parents in a series we are offering in conjunction with the JCC of Greater New Haven.

Please mark your calendars to join us on

December 14 | 7 p.m. for Picky Eaters & Toilet Training

January 11 | 7 p.m. for Challenging Behaviors

February 8 | 7 p.m. for Structure & Routine at Home

Here is the flyer for more information.

2220_jcc-parenting-pointers-flyer_110216

The field of special education and behavior analysis lost a great man last week. Stan Deno, Ph.D. served on faculty in the College of Education and Human Development at The University of Minnesota (commonly referreStan Denod to as The U) from 1970 (or so) until he retired in 2009. During that time, Stan developed a framework for monitoring student progress towards their academic goals. His work in Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) is the foundation for DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills; Good & Kiminski, 2002) which has been used in thousands of schools across the country.

Stan also trained many students including undergraduate, masters level, and doctoral level. Two of his students, Doug and Lynn Fuchs, have led the way in developing Response to Intervention (RTI) an evidence-based approach to identifying students with learning disabilities and behavior disorders.

If you don’t know Stan or haven’t read his work, you should make time to do so.¬†Without a doubt, his work has influenced the way we monitor progress in schools and the way we address instruction for students with learning and behavioral needs.

I have many fond memories of Stan. I feel so lucky to have studied with him during my time at The U. He worked diligently to help me slow down when I spoke (I talk fast and southern and it was difficult for him to understand me). He also modeled for me the act of thinking carefully before speaking. If you know me, you know I still am working on this skill!

Stan trusted me to serve as his Teaching Assistant (TA) in the Intro to ABA class. He taught me how to teach adult learners and how to give meaningful feedback on their written work. During this time, he also taught me the importance of technology in the classroom to increase graduate student participation and responding. I am a much better teacher now because of Stan.

I took several classes from Stan. The most memorable included the course on Single Subject Design. In this course, Stan introduced me to the work of Alan Kazdin and he taught me to conduct experimentally sou
nd research studies as well as how to read research and interpret and apply it in my own work. His influence enabled me to write successful grants, publish my own science, and go on to teach my own students. Stan also served on my dissertation committee where he modeled for me how to help students improve their research ideas, study procedures, and how to interpret results accurately. I was so fortunate to learn so much from him.

In addition to our love of research, behavior analysis, and helping students learn, Stan and I both shared the diagnosis of cancer. I received my diagnosis in 2002 some time after he received his diagnosis and treatment. I stopped by the U to visit Stan while I was in town later that same year. We shared how hard living as a survivor can be and we shared how crushing the diagnosis can be. It was then that Stan shared with me the theory of the Sword of Damocles. It took some time for me to truly understand this concept as a new survivor. But oh do I understand it now, 14 years later.

My heart sank to my stomach last week when I learned of Stan’s passing. But, I have joy in knowing how much he taught me and how much he has taught the special education world. Stan will be missed.

The family asks that in lieu of¬†flowers contributions be made in memory of Stanley Deno to:¬†‚ÄúStan Deno CBM Research‚ÄĚ fund #20003 at the University of Minnesota Foundation.

Online gifts can be made at:  www.give.umn.edu/giveto/standeno

Or mail this giving form to:

University of Minnesota Foundation
P.O. Box 860266
Minneapolis, MN 55486-0266

 

References

Good, R.H., & Kkaminski, R.A. (2002). Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (6th ed.). Eugene, OR: Institute for the Development of Educational Achievement. Available: http://dibels.uoregon.edu.

We are registered to do business in Tennessee! We are so thrilled to be expanding and to soon be offering services to children with behavioral challenges and their families.doing-business-in-tn

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