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Posts Tagged ‘Vomiting’

Hi and welcome to What Works Wednesdays where we share a success story from one of our clinical cases. All names have been changed to preserve the privacy of the child and family. Our intent is to show readers how successful ABA can be. Today’s story is about a young man we call “Dennis”.

Dennis came to us just slightly before his third birthday. He carried a diagnosis of autism. Like many of our children, he also had a history of reflux. His reflux was so bad that his parents reported having to place a plastic covering on the floor under his crib to protect the flooring.

Dennis was non-verbal but he had no problem making his needs known. One way that he communicated his wants and needs was by vomiting. Initially, when a non-preferred food was presented to him, he vomited until it was removed. Over time, he began to control what his Mommy ate too. If he saw her eating something he didn’t like, he vomited. By the time he got to us, he had whittled his diet down to only 3 foods: a certain brand of potato chips, peanut butter, and a beverage. His poor Mom couldn’t eat in front of him and was limited to consuming Coca Cola only in his presence. Can you even try to imagine the family stress in that house?

Readers should know that Dennis was the most adorable picky eater. His chubby cheeks were just ripe for the squeezing. His toddler hands and feet were precious. He was the kind of child that you just want to pick up and hug and kiss over and over again. With a child that cute, you know behavioral feeding therapy is going to be a challenge! It is really hard to be firm with a cutie-pie.

Because of the seriousness of the behavior and the extreme food selectivity, we asked that the parents have a complete medical work up prior to starting feeding therapy. Dennis came back clean as a whistle–he had no major issues other than the reflux.

On the first day of feeding therapy, we realized that we needed help. We rushed out to the nearest store to purchase protective gear–plastic aprons. Dennis could vomit without any effort at all and our clothes were doomed without protection. (Dennis is the worst case of vomiting we have seen in our practice to date.) In the first three sessions alone, he vomited 13 times when a total of 30 bites had been presented! When Dennis vomited, we simply cleaned up the area and re-presented a clean but identical bite of food. Dennis tried to use gagging to replace vomiting. When he gagged, we simply closed his mouth by gently pressing his chin up.

Dennis did not give up his preferences willingly. He fought us for the first two days. In addition to vomiting and gagging, he used head turns, crying, spoon batting, and other disruptive behaviors to avoid new foods. We ultimately used physical prompting to encourage him to open his mouth and take a bite. Once he accepted the bite, he discovered that it didn’t taste quite so bad. Keep in mind that Dennis was also hungry for each session. His parents did not feed him before or after therapy so if he didn’t eat with us, he didn’t eat again until the next therapy session a few hours later.

Over time, he began to fight less and less and he began accepting bites willingly. By the third day of treatment (9 sessions) Dennis had stopped vomiting.  Across the last three sessions of treatment, Dennis gagged only 2 times out of 142 bites of food and he had no vomits.

On the fourth day of treatment, we transitioned Dennis’ parents in to replace the feeding therapists. On this day, Dennis had begun to feed himself and his parents were there to make sure that his bites were not too big. His parents also reminded him to take a bite if he slowed down or looked as if he might be trying to avoid a food. It was also on this day that we taught Dennis how to eat cake for his upcoming birthday party. We all cried tears of joy to see him willingly scoop up gluten-free (GF) and dairy/casein-free birthday (CF) cake (and yes, GFCF cake tastes delicious)!

Dennis was discharged after only 12 sessions of treatment (4 days)! A few days later, his parents sent us pictures from his 3rd birthday party where he was happily eating his real birthday cake.

This success story did not come without extremely hard work by the parents. It was emotionally draining for them to see their child put up such a fight to avoid foods. It is not easy watching your baby vomit repeatedly at the sight of new/non-preferred foods. It is not easy hearing him cry repeatedly for an entire session. But they stuck with it. They stood their ground and they supported our treatment by not feeding him between meals and by requiring him to participate in therapy 3 times each day despite his tears. Congratulations on your success! The hard work paid off!

We would love to hear from readers. Have any of you worked with children who vomit? Parents, are any of your children vomiting to avoid foods? Parents, teachers, and behavior analysts, would you be able to stick with it like the parents and the therapists did?

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