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Posts Tagged ‘retention’

Ok! that moment you have all been writing about and waiting for has arrived! I have finally made enough time in my life to copy and paste our BT/RBT Onboarding for you. I’m so thrilled to be able to share anything that will make your lives easier. Thank you for your positive feedback on our previously posted BCBA Onboarding! Please know that I am always open to suggestions so please don’t be too shy to speak up.

As with our BCBA onboarding, this does not include the basics such as the job application, i9, or W4. We have recently starting using an HRIS program. (After a long and careful search, we went with Bird Dog HR because within their performance management section, they offer the ability to do electronic score cards. What better way to give feedback than an OBM strategy!?!?) So employees use that system to complete the new employee basics. This list is all other training they have to do. This is also laid out in our BirdDogHR platform so it’s really a PSI for staff as they get acclimated with Applied Behavioral Strategies as an employer.

Note that all of this training comes with handouts and forms for attestation. Some of our training is also in video format so staff don’t get bored just reading things.

Phase 1: Completed in Conjunction with HR & Onboarding Team

 

  1. Fingerprint Appointment and results
  2. NPA Code Metro Training (note, this is our practice management software. Billing and time keeping)
  3. NPA for MAC users
  4. First Aid/CPR
  5. HIPAA training video and attestation (includes HIPAA and social media. Check out this cool paper my colleagues and I wrote on this topic!)
  6. ABS Policies & Procedures Manual which also includes an attestation that staff read it.
  7. Billing Memo and Attestation. We do this to help prevent fraud. Want to know more, check out our webinar on Ethical Issues Related to Billing for ABA Services.
  8. Mandated Reporter Training
  9. Sexual Harassment Training
  10. ABS Incident Report Training

Phase 2 Training: Independent and with Training Coordinator (BCBA)

  1. RBT Training (BT) and/or change RBT supervisor with BACB
  2. RBT certificate/documentation: send to HR
  3. NPA Code Metro GO Training (using phone to render services and obtain signatures)
  4. Review Policy & Procedure (ask if RBT has questions)
  5. Review NPA Code Metro to ensure timesheet for training entered appropriately
  6. Review NPA Code Metro locking & service log review
  7. Review NPA Code Metro scheduling and service authorization
  8. Review ABS Internal Task Analysis for NPA Code Metro
  9. Review NPA Code Metro client appointment, cancellations, mileage, drive time, and time off
  10. Review NPA Code Metro Availability & Monthly Scheduling
  11. Google Drive
  12. GMail Set up and footer and ABS Internal Email Groups
  13. Google Calendar
  14. Add new staff to calendar invites for upcoming socials and trainings
  15. Review phone use policy
  16. Review Dress and Professionalism and requirements for various location of services
  17. Review ABS Procedure for Vacation request & sick/Call Out
  18. Review the performance evaluation timeline
  19. Review Mileage and Drive Time and Hybrid/Electric Benefit
  20. Review BT Billing and Rendering memo and ask for questions
  21. Assign locking supervisor
  22. Review ABS procedures for file naming and saving
  23. Staff Completes New Staff Training Test
  24. Score and Review Test

Phase 3 Completed with BCBA (Clinical Supervisor of Each Client)

  1. BIP Track training
  2. Session Note Training (SOAP Note)
  3. School Training & Orientation
  4. PBIS & Emergency Responses
  5. ABS Internal Scheduling
  6. Task List (this is the chore list for people to do when a client cancels less than 24 hours)
  7. iPad Policies and Procedures including weekly iPad Checkin
  8. At least 3 overlap sessions on client 1
  9. At least 3 overlap sessions on client 2
  10. At least 3 overlap sessions on client 3

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Hi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I respond to email questions from readers who have questions about their child’s behavior.Today’s question comes from Karen who asks,

“My son with autism is in 2nd grade and struggling with academics along with his social challenges. I am wondering if we should hold him back and keep him in 2nd grade next year. What are the things we should consider to help us with this decision?”

All parents ask this question from time to time–regardless of whether their child has a disability. Some parents hold children back so they will be older when they graduate. Others hold their children back so they will have a greater likelihood of excelling in sports. So, the good news is that you are not alone in thinking about this.

I think there are several issues to consider. Personally, I am opposed to holding a child back once they start school. Thus, if you intentionally start them a year later than their similar aged peers, I don’t believe the consequences are as severe as when you hold a child back once they have started school.

Peer Relationships are Formed

Children begin forming their peer groups on the first day of school. Yes, children begin forming relationships as early as preschool. Friendships formed at that age, can potentially last a lifetime. Once your child develops relationships, it will be detrimental to him/her to lose those relationships. Sometimes the mere separation from teacher to teacher can be enough to interfere with friendships. However, if the children remain in the same grade with different teachers, they will continue to share lunch time, recess, and some specials.

Holding your child back to repeat a grade separates him/her from friends. They must learn to fit in with social groups that have already been formed. They must eat lunch and play outside with a whole new crop of friends. If your child has issues socially, this could be an even more difficult time for him/her.

Child’s Self-Esteem

A child’s self-esteem may take a blow when they are asked to repeat a grade. Children know when their friends move on. Children know when they have to say “I’m in first grade again”. Even if you think your child is unaware, chances are he/she is fully aware, she just may lack the verbal skills to tell you.

Fitting In Size Wise

Depending on the month of your child’s birthday, when you first enrolled him/her in school, and general family genetics, your child’s height and weight (and subsequent puberty) may be an issue if you choose to hold them back. For example, if your child holds an August birthday and you choose to start 1st grade at age 7 rather than age 6 but then a couple of years later, your child repeats a grade, your child is now almost 2 years older than her classmates. Your child could be hitting puberty much sooner than her peers and she could be the victim of negative social attention for it. Moreover, the last thing you want is for your daughter to be the tallest girl in the grade (unless of course Basketball is in her future).

Research Shows Retention is Ineffective

A number of studies have been conducted on the long-term effects of grade retention, including social effects as well as academic effects. The research shows that grade retention does not result in the intended outcomes. In fact, some negative long-term effects include a greater risk of high school drop out as well as poor academic achievement.

Children Know and Remember

Finally, your child’s peers will know and remember that your child was held back. They will carry it with them over the years, “Oh yes, that’s Suzie, she was in 2nd grade with me and she had to repeat 2nd grade”. Children have so many other issues to over come, it seems odd that we would purposefully add another source of stress for them.

Resources

Here are some other resources you may find helpful:

Center for Development and Learning

National Association for School Psychologists (NASP)

A second post by NASP

Weigh In

I would love to hear from our readers on this one. Have you held your child back? How did it go or how is it going? Did your friends? Teachers and behavior analysts, what have your experiences been?

If you have a behavior question for Missy, email askmissy at applied behavioral strategies dot com.

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