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Posts Tagged ‘IDEIA’

We are thrilled to be participating in the Behavior Analysis in Education Series (BAES) through ACES! Here is a link to the entire series. Or if you want to read more about the topics, click here. If you like what you see, click here to register.idea-logo

Dr. Olive will be presenting on Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Behavior Analysts working in the schools.

We will be attending all of these and we hope to see you at them too! If you attend, be sure to say hello!

 

Want to read more on this topic? Try one of these blogs:

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Hi all,

I am pleased to announce that I will be conducting a free webinar  for Cigna on March 10th at 1:00pm. We will be talking about IEPs and parental rights during the process.

Please join us!

For more information, visit the Cigna website.

For more information on this topic try these previous posts:

  1. Whey they say No.
  2. Requesting an IEE for an FBA.
  3. Clients First.Always.

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We posted an answer to a question yesterday. As a result, we have been contacted with additional questions leading us to realize that many of our readers are in the dark about special education services. We thought we would provide readers with some background information as well as some additional resources to put in your tool chests.

Eligibility for Special Education Services

If an individual between age 3 and 21 years of age has one of 14 diagnosed disabilities and that disability impacts that person’s ability to benefit from education, he or she may be eligible for special education services from the Local Education Agency (LEA–usually the school district).

The 14 conditions include Autism, Deaf-blindness, Deafness, Hearing impairment, Mental retardation, Multiple disabilities, Orthopedic impairments, Other health impaired (which includes ADD and ADHD), Emotional disturbance, Specific learning disability, Speech or language impairment, Traumatic brain injury, Visual impairment, including blindness, or Developmental Delay (but only up to age 9).

Developing the IEP

Once the child has been determined eligible for services, the team (including the parent/guardian) work collaboratively to develop a plan for services. This plan is called the Individualized Educational Program (IEP).

The IEP is made up of several important parts including goals and objectives, type and amount of special education services, need for assistive technology, need for behavior support, and list of related services including type and amount.

Related Services

As we discussed yesterday, the federal law lists a number of possible related services. These services include: Audiology, Counseling, Early Identification and Assessment, Medical Services, Occupational Therapy (OT) and Physical Therapy (PT), Orientation and Mobility, Parent Counseling and Training, Psychological, Recreation, Rehabilitation, School Health, Social Work, Speech Pathology, Transportation, Interpreters, and Assistive Technology.

It is important to note that the federal law specifically states that the services include those listed but that services are not limited to those listed. What does that mean…Not limited to?

Well, that means that your child may receive other services under Related Services. As we mentioned yesterday, the services are determined based on your child’s needs. Thus, the IEP should carefully document what your child needs in order to benefit from education. Some examples of other related services include:

  • Nutrition
  • Medical services that are not limited to an MD
  • Music therapy

ABA as a Related Service

And of course, our favorite related service is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). Yes, ABA may be listed in your child’s IEP as a related service. In fact, so many children in Connecticut have ABA as a service that the state actually has a law that will go in to effect this year related to who must supervise the individuals providing the ABA services to children with IEPs.

As we approach IEP season, make time to participate actively in the development of your child’s IEP. Work diligently to ensure that the document carefully reflects all of your child’s needs. Make certain that your child receives all of the related services that he/she (or you) need in order to benefit from education.

If you like the information here, you may find other resources on this same topic to be helpful.

 

Let's BEE Friends

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Hi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I respond to email questions from readers who have questions about behavior. Today’s question comes from an anonymous writer who recently learned about services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA). Individuals who are eligible for services under the IDEIA, may receive a variety of services including but not limited to:

  • Audiology
  • Counseling
  • Early Identification and Assessment
  • Medical Services
  • OT and PT
  • Orientation and Mobility
  • Parent Counseling and Training
  • Psychological
  • Recreation
  • Rehabilitation
  • School Health
  • Social Work
  • Speech Pathology
  • Transportation
  • Interpreters
  • Assistive Technology

The anonymous reader asked, “Parents can receive services under parent counseling and training? Do schools have to teach ABA to parents?”

The short answer to these questions: yes and yes.

The long answer is a bit more complicated.

The IEP and IFSP Drive Services

The document that is developed is incredibly important. The document, whether it is the Individualized Education Program (IEP) or the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), determines what services are needed. Take extra care when developing your child’s IEP or IFSP.

Parent Counseling and Training Defined

The IDEIA has defined parent counseling and training. Specifically, parent counseling and training is for assisting parents in understanding the special needs of their child, providing parents with information about child development, and helping parents learn the skills that will help them carry out their child’s IEP or IFSP.

Thus, if you need to learn ABA in order to carry out your child’s IEP or IFSP, then by all means, the agency must provide you with training on ABA.

Treat the IEP and IFSP as a Contract

We cannot stress enough the importance of carefully developing your child’s IEP or IFSP. Read over every single detail before agreeing to its implementation. The signed document is your child’s contract with the agency until the next IEP or IFSP is developed.

If you have questions about behavior, email Missy at askmissy at appliedbehavioralstrategies dot com.

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