Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘ethics for behavior analysts’

I recently shared our publication regarding what to expect during an FBA. We also had a publication come out in January in Behavior Analysis in Practice. I wrote the article with 3 other colleagues (Patrick O’Leary, Megan Miller, and Amanda Kelly) titled, “Blurred Lines: Ethical Implications in Social Media for Behavior Analysts”. social mediaIf you would like to read the article you may purchase it here. If you are a full member of ABAI, you may be able to access it through the ABAI portal at no charge.

I am sharing this article today as a reminder that Patrick O’Leary, the lead author of the paper will be offering a webinar on this very topic. The webinar is scheduled for Thursday, April 30th, at 4pm eastern. You may complete the webinar in the comfort of your home or office. What a great way to earn your required 4 ethics credits!

If you are interested in registering, please visit our website and complete the form. Click on submit and use PayPal to complete payment with your PayPal account or to use a credit card.

Read Full Post »

New Year ResolutionAs behavior analysts, we are faced with many responsibilities. Before we even think about seeing clients, we must first acknowledge the need to uphold our ethical obligations. We have a number of rules and principles to keep in mind. These include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Core ethical principles for psychologists
  • BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct
  • State Laws
  • Federal Laws

As we embark on the new year, I have a few resolutions for me and my fellow behavior analysts to consider.

  1. I will strive to keep reinforcement a top priority by conducting preference assessments and reinforcer inventories frequently (relates to BACB Guideline 4.05)
  2. I will strive to keep my client’s rights ahead of my own interests and conveniences (relates to BACB Guideline 2.0)
  3. I will strive to engage in professional behaviors at all times so that others view our profession with high regard (relates to BACB Guideline 7.01)
  4. I will strive to remain current in the research related to my area of practice (relates to BACB Guideline 1.03)
  5. I will strive to be the best behavior analyst that I can be (relates to Guideline 1.0)

Read Full Post »

We know that ethics is not a laughing matter. However, today is Friday and we are always up for a little Friday humor! Thank you Clay Bennett for your brilliant work!

Read Full Post »

Hi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I respond to email questions from readers who have questions about their child’s behavior. Today’s question comes from a participant in our workshop on Saturday. After reviewing Special Education Law and the associated ethical issues for practicing behavior analysts, the following question came up:

“How do we attend IEP meetings and participate without taking sides? We cannot be on the school’s side and we cannot be on the parents’ side.”

We have no choice but to turn to our “Ethics Bible” to help us answer this question. We use the Bailey and Burch (2011) “Ethics for Behavior Analysts“. We feel strongly that every behavior analyst should have this book and they should keep it out where they can easily access it (paperback is much cheaper). The book reviews the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct that were developed by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (and to which all behavior analysts agree to follow). The book also provides illustrative case examples to help behavior analysts avoid finding themselves in sticky situations.

Responsibility to Client

In this book, you will see that Guideline 2.0 states, “The behavior analyst has a responsibility to operate in the best interest of the client.” Thus, when you attend IEP, IFSP, and other relevant meetings, your first concern belongs to the client you serve. While you may be paid by one party, any contract you sign at the outset of services, should clearly state that you have a responsibility to the client, even if it means that your professional recommendations do not align with  the party who pays your salary.

Responsibility to Other Parties

If you go on to read, you will see that Guideline 2.03 states, “The behavior analyst’s responsibility is to all parties affected by behavioral services.” Now you will see that you also have a responsibility to the parents as they are directly affected by your behavioral services. However, if you serve your client in the school setting, now you have a responsibility to the school as well. If you find yourself caught in the middle of the parents and the school, your number one priority is your client so act on his/her behalf.

Client Rights Under the Law

Finally, Guideline 2.06 states, “the behavior analyst supports individual rights under the law.” As a behavior analyst who works in schools, you have the responsibility to become educated on the laws that affect your client. You have a duty to ensure that you follow those laws and that you support your clients rights under those laws. If you do not know special education law and want to learn more, consider enrolling in one of our workshops on this topic. We will be conducting a day-long workshop at the ABA International Conference in Seattle and we will offer our webinar again in the fall.

In summary, if you find yourself stuck in the middle between parents and the school, remember, your first responsibility is to the client and then you have equal responsibility to the parents and the school team.

How many of our fellow behavior analysts have been in this position? I have to also ask, how many fellow teachers have been put in this position? Teachers, too, have responsibilities to their students. They often find it difficult to advocate for the child when they know how expensive services can be. Readers, how have you handled these predicaments?

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: