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Posts Tagged ‘Autism’

Hi all,

I am pleased to announce that I will be conducting a free webinar  for Cigna on March 10th at 1:00pm. We will be talking about IEPs and parental rights during the process.

Please join us!

For more information, visit the Cigna website.

For more information on this topic try these previous posts:

  1. Whey they say No.
  2. Requesting an IEE for an FBA.
  3. Clients First.Always.

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We came across a new video about autism recovery that we are excited about! One of our parents actually found it first. When the mom talked about it, I just assumed it was another CARD video as they have been the predominant leaders in this area. Interestingly, it was not from CARD but rather a professionally produced video from UCONN!

We have been a fan of Dr. Fein since we first learned that she studied children on the spectrum. See one of our previous posts here. She is not a behavior analyst but rather a licensed clinical psychologist. She is not in the business of ABA but rather a professor in clinical psychology. You can read more about her here.

So…..now for the video. We hope it inspires you as much as it does us!

http://medvideos.org/video/215/is-it-possible-to-recover-from-autism

 

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It’s Fridaaaaaaaaaaaaay! I don’t know about you all but Friday was a long time coming. We look forward to Fridays around here for many reasons:boy hitting

  1. Friday happy hours
  2. Sleep in on Saturday
  3. Pizza night (doesn’t everyone do pizza night on Friday?)
  4. And Friday Funnies on the ABS Blog!

So we have been writing down all the funny things our kids say. We will share some of them with our readers. For today:

“John” was having a difficult morning in his class. He engaged in a few aggressive behaviors towards the behavior therapist (BT). The BT suggested that John step in the hall so as not to disrupt his peers. At that time, the supervising BCBA walked down the hall and saw John aggressing toward the BT. When John saw the BCBA, he began aggressing to the BCBA. The BCBA blocked the behaviors as planned. After a great deal of blocking, John stopped his aggression, looked at the BCBA and said, “You’ve got nice moves!”

Do you have any funny Kid Quotes to share?

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inclusionI am so excited to be in Dubai! I came to consult on a few feeding cases and The Child Learning and Enrichment Medical Center quickly planned for a conference on inclusion! Schools in Dubai are required to include children with disabilities so teachers are in need of information. I feel so fortunate to be a part of it! For my international readers, I look forward to meeting you in person.

For additional information on the inclusion conference, click here: http://www.childeimc.com/index.html

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Hi and welcome to What Works Wednesdays where the focus is usually the description of a successful case story. Today’s story actually comes from a popular video. In this video, the photographers captured the faces of several young children as they tried new food for the first time. Matt Gilmour, the creative director and Hugh Miller, the cinematographer, capture the children’s reactions in 500 frames per second.

As a BCBA who has helped many, many children learn to eat new foods, I cannot help but recognize that the children in this video are not scared. The children in the video are willingly trying new food. Sadly, for children who have autism, trying new foods does not look like this. Trying new foods can result in aggressive behaviors, self-injurious behaviors, even vomiting!

However, after effective behavioral feeding therapy, children with autism can learn to try [and like] new foods. If you have a child who engages in picky eating, reach out for assistance from a behavioral feeding program; mealtime does not have to be stressful.

Related Articles

 

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"A child with autism (three years old) po...

“A child with autism (three years old) pointing to the fish in an aquarium.” The photo demonstrates a controlled randomized test by Kasari, Stephanny Freeman and Tanya Paparella to determine whether intensive training in sharing attention (in this case, pointing at fish) and pretend playing can lay the groundwork for the acquisition of language skills and subsequent normal development. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I answer a question from a reader. Today’s question comes from a mom with a newly diagnosed child on the autism spectrum. She is searching for answers at all hours of the night. Marie says,

“Hi Missy, I am very new to this autism thing. I have heard that children with autism can get better–even lose the diagnosis completely. Is this true or is this some quackery to get me to buy something I cannot afford? Where can I read more about this treatment and how do I know if it’s real?”

Hi Marie and thanks for stopping by the blog. You are not being sold “quackery”. The truth is that children with autism CAN recover–even lose the diagnosis. I have written about this before (here, here, and here), which is probably how you found this blog.

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy is the only treatment that has been proven to help children recover from autism. Dr. Lovaas is best known for his study describing the improvements of almost half the children who received the treatment. Other scientists have replicated his research with similar outcomes. Unfortunately, scientists do not yet know which children will recover, only that some recover.

We do know that intervention must start early, it must be intense (40 hours of therapy per week), and that it must last for 2 years or more. We also know that therapy must address all areas of development including speech and language, social and emotional skills, gross and fine motor, self-help and adaptive skills, as well as academic skills.

ABA is an appropriate treatment for children with autism. In fact, 32 states have legislation requiring certain types of insurance to cover ABA therapy. Check

out this resource to see if your state is included.

You may also find some of the work by Dr. Fein helpful. She has no association with ABA whatsoever and she has published several papers on this topic as well.

Finally, we know that many children on the autism spectrum are sick. The illnesses include GI disease, food allergies, mitochondrial disorders, and other things. Thus, in addition to using ABA to teach your child, you will need to include medical support to address any underlying medical condition that your child may have.

I am sorry that your child has been diagnosed but I hope that you will pursue active treatment as soon as you possibly can.

If you have a question email askmissy at applied behavioral strategies dot com.

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Don’t forget to Light It Up Blue today!light it up

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