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Posts Tagged ‘Autism’

Hi and welcome to What Works Wednesdays where the focus is usually the description of a successful case story. Today’s story actually comes from a popular video. In this video, the photographers captured the faces of several young children as they tried new food for the first time. Matt Gilmour, the creative director and Hugh Miller, the cinematographer, capture the children’s reactions in 500 frames per second.

As a BCBA who has helped many, many children learn to eat new foods, I cannot help but recognize that the children in this video are not scared. The children in the video are willingly trying new food. Sadly, for children who have autism, trying new foods does not look like this. Trying new foods can result in aggressive behaviors, self-injurious behaviors, even vomiting!

However, after effective behavioral feeding therapy, children with autism can learn to try [and like] new foods. If you have a child who engages in picky eating, reach out for assistance from a behavioral feeding program; mealtime does not have to be stressful.

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"A child with autism (three years old) po...

“A child with autism (three years old) pointing to the fish in an aquarium.” The photo demonstrates a controlled randomized test by Kasari, Stephanny Freeman and Tanya Paparella to determine whether intensive training in sharing attention (in this case, pointing at fish) and pretend playing can lay the groundwork for the acquisition of language skills and subsequent normal development. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I answer a question from a reader. Today’s question comes from a mom with a newly diagnosed child on the autism spectrum. She is searching for answers at all hours of the night. Marie says,

“Hi Missy, I am very new to this autism thing. I have heard that children with autism can get better–even lose the diagnosis completely. Is this true or is this some quackery to get me to buy something I cannot afford? Where can I read more about this treatment and how do I know if it’s real?”

Hi Marie and thanks for stopping by the blog. You are not being sold “quackery”. The truth is that children with autism CAN recover–even lose the diagnosis. I have written about this before (here, here, and here), which is probably how you found this blog.

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy is the only treatment that has been proven to help children recover from autism. Dr. Lovaas is best known for his study describing the improvements of almost half the children who received the treatment. Other scientists have replicated his research with similar outcomes. Unfortunately, scientists do not yet know which children will recover, only that some recover.

We do know that intervention must start early, it must be intense (40 hours of therapy per week), and that it must last for 2 years or more. We also know that therapy must address all areas of development including speech and language, social and emotional skills, gross and fine motor, self-help and adaptive skills, as well as academic skills.

ABA is an appropriate treatment for children with autism. In fact, 32 states have legislation requiring certain types of insurance to cover ABA therapy. Check

out this resource to see if your state is included.

You may also find some of the work by Dr. Fein helpful. She has no association with ABA whatsoever and she has published several papers on this topic as well.

Finally, we know that many children on the autism spectrum are sick. The illnesses include GI disease, food allergies, mitochondrial disorders, and other things. Thus, in addition to using ABA to teach your child, you will need to include medical support to address any underlying medical condition that your child may have.

I am sorry that your child has been diagnosed but I hope that you will pursue active treatment as soon as you possibly can.

If you have a question email askmissy at applied behavioral strategies dot com.

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Don’t forget to Light It Up Blue today!light it up

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5,56 mm HS Produkt VHS-D assault rifle

5,56 mm HS Produkt VHS-D assault rifle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!

I am so tired of hearing people blame the Newtown shooting on Asperger’s.

Let us look at the real explanations for the shooting:

  • an assault rifle
  • hyper media coverage of previous mass shootings
  • lack of treatment for mental health

Bushmaster Assault Rifle

Why would any human (other than military and law enforcement personnel) want or need to own such a weapon? The fact that a mother purchased this weapon and kept it in her house is shocking to me. I once dated a man, who I later found had a gun in his night stand drawer. When I discovered this, I ended the relationship immediately. I do not want to live in the same house with a gun of any sort.

I should share an important side not here. My brother bought his wife a hand gun for her birthday and I still love both of them dearly. But a hand gun is quite different from an assault rifle. There is no need for an assault rifle. Period.

Mass Media Coverage

I am the first person to admit that I love the media. I am a media addict. I watch Nancy and relate to her as my BFF (although my other half refers to her as Nancy Dis Grace). Perhaps it is the behavior analyst in me. I want to understand the psychology and the environmental events that led humans to engage in behaviors that kill. I have the same interest in the Newtown shootings. What led a young man to kill innocent women and children?

Despite my need or desire to know, I would give it all up right now in order to prevent future mass murders. But media coverage alone did not cause the shootings. Media coverage gives people the ideas to do it bigger.

Mental Health Treatment

While we are still in the dark about the events leading up to the shooting, we do know that all the other mass murderers had histories of mental health issues. It seems that only one of those killers had been receiving treatment; but even his treatment was limited. Yet, all of the parents had previously admitted that their child had issues. Clearly, our current health care system failed each and every one of those killers.

Our current health care system does not adequately address the mental health needs of individuals. I sat and listened to hours of testimony at a recent hearing on this very topic in CT. You can listen to the hours of testimony here.

Leaders in each state and in Washington DC need to take action. We need an active plan for preventing these types of violent rampages from occurring again.

There will be a bigger shooting. It is just a matter of time.That is, unless we make changes. We need changes in our gun laws and changes in our mental health treatment. The two entities must work together because individuals with mental illness should not have access to guns of any type.

Post script: Thanks to Rena for pointing out a very important missing piece.

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ADHDHi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I respond to a question from readers. Today’s question comes from Andrea who asks,

“I have a 4-year-old who was diagnosed with autism within the last 6 months. He is extremely hyperactive and inattentive. What medication do you find to be most helpful?”

Hi Andrea, and thanks for taking the time to write. I am sorry to hear about your child being diagnosed with autism but he is young so there is ample time to get appropriate intervention to help him.

Please know that as a behavior analyst and special educator, I am not licensed to practice medicine. So, making recommendations about medication is out of my preview.

However, as behavior analysts, we are trained to address all types of behaviors, including hyperactive and inattentive behaviors.

Assessment

Before we address any behaviors, we first complete assessments to better understand why the behaviors are happening. The assessment includes record reviews, interviews, and asking those who know the child to complete rating scales. The assessments also include observations of the child to better understand when the behaviors are good versus when the behaviors are bad. Finally, we may even conduct analyses to determine which environmental conditions directly affect the behavior.

Intervention

Once the assessments have been completed, the behavior analyst will help design interventions to address the behaviors of concern. Behavioral interventions can be designed to address attentive behaviors, impulsive behaviors, and skills related to following instructions.

Health Interventions

In addition to behavioral intervention, parents should also consider whole body interventions that address the overall health of the child. Children need daily physical activity and I am not talking about using their fingers to control the remote or the iPad. Children need full body physical activity every single day.

Children also need a healthy diet. If your child eats mostly processed foods full of sugars, fake color, and other artificial ingredients, then you should change the diet before considering the use of medication to treat behaviors that may very well be caused by foods.

Finally, children need far more sleep than they are getting. Children need at least 10 hours of sleep each night. Children (nor adults) can make up for lost sleep so make sure that your child goes to bed early and sleeps as late as possible.

When All Else Fails

If you have followed all of the other advice above (consistently) and your child continues to have behavioral issues, then consider seeing a behavioral pediatrician to assist you in determining if medication is the right thing for your child. Medication should not be your first stop, it should be your last.

If you have a behavioral question for me, email askmissy at applied behavioral strategies dot com.

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princess KateAll the fuss this week seems to be about Princess “Kate”, her pregnancy, and resulting hyperemesis gravidarum (or extreme morning sickness). I (Missy) can admit that I have been enamored with Princess Kate in the past. She’s beautiful, smart, fit, and independent–all the ingredients for a role model.

When I read that she was hospitalized, my first thought was “what if her child develops autism?”

Don’t get me wrong, I would never wish autism on anyone. Ever. But maybe, if autism introduces itself to celebrity, someone will finally do something about the biggest epidemic facing our world.

Sure, there have been other celebrities with children with autism (Doug Flutie, Sylvester Stallone, Holly Robinson Peete, and Dan Marino). And while some of those individuals have done things to increase autism awareness, none of those individuals have actually stressed finding the cause, cure, or prevention of autism.

Thankfully, the US Committee on Oversight and Reform is interested in finding some answers. Hopefully, they will find the answers soon. Unfortunately, it may be too late for Princess Kate whose child, if it is a boy, has a 1 in 54 chance of developing autism.

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cursiveHi and welcome to Ask Missy Mondays where I respond to a question from readers. Today’s question comes from Angela who is the mother of a 3rd grader with a diagnosis of autism. Angela asks,

“Hi Missy, I have been reading your blog for a while. Thanks for all the help and advice you provide to us as parents. I’m writing now because I have come to a crossroad for my child. Chris has responded brilliantly to ABA and is doing very well in many areas. He is reading on grade level, he is doing math on grade level, and he is above grade level in science. He continues to struggle with fine motor skills which is common among children in this population. As you probably know, in third grade, children learn to write in cursive. Chris tried this for the first two days but it is going to take him a long time to master the entire alphabet. Who knows how long it will take him to put letters together to form words? What do you think about this? Should we keep working on this even if it means he may fall behind in reading and math? Thanks in advance for your help on this.”

Hi Angela, and thanks for writing. It is ironic that you emailed with this question. One of my current clients went through this exact issue just a few weeks ago. As a supervisor, I always take the family preferences in to consideration.

Parent Input

Right away, the first thing I would do is ask the parent (in this case, it is you), “How important is it for you for your child to learn to write in cursive?”

Socially Stigmatizing

The next question I ask is, “If your child does not learn to do this skill, will it be socially stigmatizing for him?” In this same area, I have to also ask, “Is it going to be socially stigmatizing for him to learn how to do this skill? Will his friends laugh at him if he doesn’t learn it as fast as they do?”

Essential Life Skill

The next question I ask is, “Is this skill essential for your child to do in order to be independent?”. Some skills are absolutely necessary. Handwriting is not one of those essential skills. I cannot tell you the last time I wrote in cursive. Even my signature is a scribble more than a signature. So, your child will need to learn to sign his name but he is allowed some creativity in doing this. I honestly don’t think the majority of people use proper D’Nealian when signing important documents.

I hope this helped to answer your question, Angela. I also want to point you to some other blogs on this same topic (listed below) as you may find them helpful too.

If you have a behavioral question for me email me directly at askmissy at applied behavioral strategies dot com. Thanks!

 

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